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Cover: best of club swimming: butterfly foundations
Best of Club Swimming: Butterfly Foundations

with Jeff Julian,
Rose Bowl Aquatics Head Coach and General Manager;
8x All-American, Pac-10 Champion, and U.S. National Team Olympics Trial Qualifier; has coached of many Olympic Trial & Collegiate Swimmers.

Jeff Julian teaches age group swimmers that while butterfly is a demanding stroke, it can be easier and more fun to swim when you focus on two things: keeping your power going forward and maintaining your rhythm. That creates momentum - easy energy for faster, more sustainable butterfly.

Julian breaks down the butterfly stroke so that age group swimmers can learn to appreciate its power and rhythm. Stressing the importance of the pull & catch and keeping the body in a forward motion, he will have even the novice flyer swimming in a relaxed position while not compromising on power or speed. He explains what to look for in the stroke:

  • Develop a powerful catch and pull that propels the body forward, with no up-and-down motion that wastes energy and increases drag
  • Why hand entry and the shape of the pull is critical for maintaining power
  • How to time the breath so it's supported by the pull and doesn't disrupt the stroke's rhythm
  • Sustain rhythm that doesn't change between a breath and a non-breath stroke cycle, and learn why the non-breath stroke may be the culprit when the two are uneven
  • Learn to balance power and tempo for speed that even younger swimmers or tired racers can achieve

Undulation and Kick

Julian takes swimmers through undulation and kick drills to help them build maximum power by making sure the body motion starts all the way up in the core and that the up-kick and down-kick are balanced and strong. Swimmers that rely only on their arms tire quickly. Teaching the entire body to work together creates a smooth, sustainable stroke.

Arms

Use the Power Catch Drill to focus on connecting a powerful catch and accelerating pull for a forward surge that maximizes momentum. Learn why the right catch sets up the entire stroke and how to spot catch flaws that create problems in the other phases of the stroke.

Drills as Diagnostics

Learn how developmental swimmers are not the only swimmers who rely on butterfly drills. Advanced swimmers learn to use butterfly drills during warm up to develop consistency and spot stroke problems before they become entrenched.

Turns

The faster you can get your knees up, the faster you can get your body turned around. Learn to adjust strokes before the flags so that you can hit the wall with full momentum to take into the turn. Carry that momentum off the wall for a surge through your breakout.

Starts

Learn to send power and momentum forward at the beep for a powerful start with no wasted motion. Engage arms to get your body over the water before your front leg pushes for the right angle of entry at the fastest speed.

If you want to break down the flow of the stroke from the pull & catch, the timing of the breath, or the recovery of the stroke, this is the video you need. Julian's easy to follow instructions with great in-water demonstrations and below-water videos is a great resource for coaches of all levels. His drills are easy enough for novice swimmers, but still helpful enough to refine the stroke of the most advanced swimmers. This is a great butterfly video to add to your collection!

Age group swimmers of all levels will learn what they can do to improve their butterfly now and keep getting it faster.

65 minutes. 2017.

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions

Cover: best of club: technical drill progressions for successful freestyle
Best of Club: Technical Drill Progressions for Successful Freestyle

with Kevin Zacher,
Scottsdale Aquatic Club Head Coach;
American Swimming Coaches Association (ASCA) Level 5 certified coach;
2007 ASCA Arizona Age Group Coach of the Year

While biomechanical principles exist to inform coaches about effective technique, it becomes challenging to adapt these principles to each swimmer. Kevin Zacher guides you through the technical building blocks to success in the freestyle stroke, which has resulted in him coaching a national age group record holder and an Olympic medalist.

With the assistance of two young national level swimmers, Coach Zacher demonstrates his unique approach to individualizing the stroke. Because each swimmer is different, they must apply different approaches to technique to find what works best for them. With the use of various tools and drills, they'll help you get a feel for the water to help transfer power efficiently.

Freestyle Stroke Progression

Go through a series of drills that helps the swimmer connect the body with the stroke. The focus is on all aspects of the stroke: establishing a low resistance body position, developing a propulsive kick, having a clean entry and catch, engaging in an effective and strong pull, and having a smooth exit and recovery. You'll see drills to enforce each of these elements of the stroke, including:

  • Muscle Activation Series
  • Kicking Drills
  • Body Connection Drills

Coach Zacher explains each drill and its appropriateness for a specific movement. The biggest benefit is seeing the drills performed by two world class athletes. These two swimmers have achieved their success with different techniques. This can help you better understand how to adapt basic freestyle skills to individual differences.

Freestyle Starts, Turns and Finishes

This video gives more than technique drills for swimming; it takes time to give great detail on starts, turns, and finishes. For the forward start, the objective is to get into the water with as much speed as possible and carry that speed into the full stroke. The swimmer goes through the full setup of the body position when they're on the block, the take off, the entry, and transitioning to the breakout. Zacher demonstrates how to take advantage of each swimmers' strengths.

For the freestyle turn segment, Zacher gives verbal cues to use when teaching/coaching the turn. He emphasizes the importance of generating speed into the turn in order to carry that speed into the underwater portion that transitions to the breakout. The progression includes the approach, rotation, acceleration off of the wall, underwater kicks, and breakout.

The finish is an important part of the race, and Zacher delivers a laser-focused message on what to say to your swimmers to motivate them to finish correctly. He explains the importance of maintaining the speed and the body line all the way into the wall; things like: keeping the head still, rotating the body to the side to take advantage of the long reach, and being able to touch the wall in the middle to make sure the touch pad is hit properly.

Coach Zacher gives you an excellent supply of tools to improve your coaching for improved freestyle swimming performance. With over 50 different drills variations, you'll have many options to improve freestyle technique, starting, turning, and finishing performance.

100 minutes. 2017.

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions

Cover: training the 5th stroke: progressions & drills for the underwater kick
Training the 5th Stroke: Progressions & Drills for the Underwater Kick

with Kevin Zacher,
Scottsdale Aquatic Club Head Coach;
American Swimming Coaches Association (ASCA) Level 5 certified coach;
2007 ASCA Arizona Age Group Coach of the Year

Underwater dolphin kicking is a critical skill every top swimmer needs to master. However, many coaches struggle with how to successfully incorporate the underwater kick into warm-up, drill and training sets.

In this video, Coach Kevin Zacher shares his strategy for helping each swimmer find the right size and tempo of kick for their current abilities. He introduces drills and training sets that build speed, endurance, and power for swimmers of every age group, including warm-up routines his world-class swimmers use on race day to be sure their underwater swimming provides them with the best possible competitive edge.

Warm-up Routine for Underwater Kicking

Coach Zacher addresses the importance of including underwater kicking in warm-ups. This helps activate the core and prepare breathing stamina safely. He addresses the difficulty some swimmers have with breath control, encouraging swimmers to learn how proper breath control feels.

Establishing an underwater warm-up routine during daily practice also gives his swimmers an edge on race day. Swimmers who are aware of small daily variations in their underwater kick are better prepared to sense how their kick feels in race warm-ups and make adjustments to emerge at the right mark with optimum explosive speed.

Underwater Kicking Drills

Zacher shares drills designed to help athletes find their ideal mix of amplitude and tempo of kick for their body type and fitness level. He uses resistance drills to help swimmers feel the water and eliminate dead spots for consistent rhythmic power throughout each kick cycle. Other drills help swimmers hold their ideal body line by challenging their core so that they can engage their entire body in the underwater stroke. Kicking drills work the stroke in both directions, so that the up kick is as powerful and propulsive as the down kick.

Equipment Work

Underwater kicking benefits from the use of equipment that either assists or resists the swimmer's efforts. Adding resistance helps the swimmer feel weak spots in their kick to build consistently rhythmic and powerful strokes. Coach Zacher shows you how to add:

  • Nets or kicking socks to build water feel in the feet, to encourage proper angles for maximum propulsion.
  • Drag with parachutes to help your swimmers feel that more power is generated from manipulating the movement than from simply kicking harder, creating more effortless speed.
  • Assistance, such as with fins, allows swimmers to swim at race speed longer, building familiarity with pace without fatigue that could break down technique.

Training Sets

By creating physically and mentally challenging underwater kick training sets, Zacher establishes the importance of underwater kicking and helps swimmers understand the intensity he looks for in training and in races. Kick speed sets break down world class kick speed into small segments that athletes can master and then build on by increasing duration or reducing rest between sets. Drill/Training combination sets like Cobra Drills help swimmers carry underwater speed through their breakout and into their strokes. Turn sets teach swimmers to treat the approach/turn/pause/underwater and breakout into a cohesive attack on the turns for maximum speed.

Bonus: Question & Answer Session

Coach Zacher engages world-class underwater kicker Ryan Hoffer in a discussion of some of the frequently asked questions he has received when training the fifth stroke. This segment makes it clear that the best underwater swimmers pay attention to detail in training every day so that they can come to recognize natural variations in their stroke. The swimmer describes how training loads may cause "heavy legs" that feel sluggish, and how using fins may help him train on those days. Conversely, he sometimes has "light legs" - when his feet don't feel like they are holding enough water and he turns to nets or training socks to get his water feel back.

Rhythmic and powerful underwater dolphin kicking is not just beautiful to watch - it's increasingly essential for competitive swimming at all levels. Coach Zacher helps age group coaches incorporate underwater kick training in every aspect of swimming, from warm-ups to racing. Improve your swimmers' underwater technique today!

52 minutes. 2017.

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions

Cover: best of championship swimming 4-pack: 300 drills for all strokes
Best of Championship Swimming 4-Pack: 300 Drills for All Strokes
MD-05079A:

featuring:

  • Richard Quick, former Head Coach at Texas (W), Auburn (M/W) and Stanford (W) Universities; 3x Olympic Coach; 12 NCAA Team Championships, 5x NCAA Coach of the Year
  • David Marsh, Head Coach, SwimMAC Carolina; 2016 USA Women's Olympic Team Head Coach, 12x NCAA Championship and 8x NCAA Coach of the Year (Auburn), 3x USA Men's Olympic Team Assistant
  • Frank Busch, USA Swimming National Team Director; 2x U.S. Olympic Swim Coach, former University of Arizona Head Coach; 2x NCAA Championship Coach; 6x National Coach of the Year; member of the American Swim Coaches Association (ASCA) Hall of Fame (2008)
  • Ian Pope, Melbourne Vicentre Swimming Club Head Coach, Olympic and National Team Coach for Australia; has coached a Gold Medalist in 6 consecutive World Championships ('98 to '09)
  • Bill Dorenkott, Ohio State's Women's Head Swimming Coach; has coached 28 student-athletes to 34 Big Ten individual championships
  • Bill Wadley, Head Coach for Ohio State's men's swim team, 2010 Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year
  • Coley Stickels, USA National Team Coach; Head Coach of Canyons Aquatic Club; 14x NCAA All-American with University of Arizona
  • Matt Kredich, University of Tennessee Head Coach; 2x SEC Women's Coach of the Year, 4x Ivy League Coach of the Year
  • Eddie Reese, University of Texas Head Men's Swimming Coach; 2010 NCAA Champions; 3x Olympic Head Coach, 10 NCAA Championships, 8x NCAA Coach of the Year; member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame
  • Arthur Albiero, University of Louisville Head Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving Coach; 2012 National Coach of the Year; 2014 ACC Coach of the Year (3x Big East Coach of the Year); 2012 Olympic Coach for Portugal
  • Jack Bauerle, University of Georgia Head men's and women's swim coach; 4x NCAA Women's champion, 7x SEC Women's champion, 5x NCAA coach of the year, 12xSEC Coach of the Year; 2008 U.S. Olympic Women's Head Coach

Freestyle is the most fundamental stroke in swimming and, therefore, great technique is essential to avoid injury, increase quality practice time, and build a distinct feel for the water. The instructors in this video have thousands of hours of experience instructing their athletes and demonstrate exceptional teaching techniques that increase understanding and critical thinking.

Isolate each component - kick, catch, pull, rotation, breathing, etc. - to diagnose stroke flaws, including flaws that are hidden by other components of the stroke. Make corrections and condition all the building blocks of the stroke, then use progressions to build the stroke from the core out and the kick up for fast, efficient and sustainable freestyle. Coaches of swimmers at all levels will find drills they can add to make workouts more productive and their swimmers more successful.

Body Alignment

You'll see drills that help athletes learn the posture - from head to toe - that will support natural buoyancy in the water and provide greater power of stroke with less drag, using arms to control the balance. Through daily use of these drills, a coach or swimmer can alleviate many problems regarding water flow. These drills will help:

  • Develop lateral balance, allowing freestylers to be comfortable traveling on their sides, rather than on their stomachs, for less resistance and more sustainable speed
  • Teach swimmers with "heavy legs," particularly sprinters, to create a balanced body line that supports the hips and legs, leaving the kick for propulsion

Training the Kick

A high, tight, and fast kick helps to provide the speed needed to move the body quickly through the water while helping to maintain body line. You'll learn to build strength and stamina so that the kick is still strong at the end of the race. The coaches also teach you to help swimmers build a kick that is powered from the core for more propulsion using less energy.

Catch and Rhythm

Learn drills that teach hand entry and hip rotation timing to eliminate wasted motion in the start of each stroke. You'll see sculling and catch drills to develop water feel and strength to help swimmers set the best anchor to pull past for the best distance per stroke. Rhythm drills coordinate the timing of the arm and leg movements through a strong core to keep the swimmer riding the ideal body line without loss of momentum anywhere in the stroke cycle.

Breathing Mechanics

Learn to look for breathing errors - late breathing, slow breathing, over-rotating to breathe, etc. - and how to correct them.

These coaches understand what makes championship-caliber freestyle strokes at all levels of competition. Add this video to your library and start reaping the benefits today!

153 minutes. 2017.



MD-05079B:

featuring:

  • Richard Quick, former Head Coach at Texas (W), Auburn (M/W) and Stanford (W) Universities; 3x Olympic Coach; 12 NCAA Team Championships, 5x NCAA Coach of the Year
  • David Marsh, Head Coach, SwimMAC Carolina; 2016 USA Women's Olympic Team Head Coach, 12x NCAA Championship and 8x NCAA Coach of the Year (Auburn), 3x USA Men's Olympic Team Assistant
  • Frank Busch, USA Swimming National Team Director; 2x U.S. Olympic Swim Coach, former University of Arizona Head Coach; 2x NCAA Championship Coach; 6x National Coach of the Year; member of the American Swim Coaches Association (ASCA) Hall of Fame (2008)
  • Ian Pope, Melbourne Vicentre Swimming Club Head Coach, Olympic and National Team Coach for Australia; has coached a Gold Medalist in 6 consecutive World Championships ('98 to '09)
  • Bill Dorenkott, Ohio State's Women's Head Swimming Coach; has coached 28 student-athletes to 34 Big Ten individual championships
  • Bill Wadley, Head Coach for Ohio State's men's swim team, 2010 Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year
  • Coley Stickels, USA National Team Coach; Head Coach of Canyons Aquatic Club; 14x NCAA All-American with University of Arizona
  • Matt Kredich, University of Tennessee Head Coach; 2x SEC Women's Coach of the Year, 4x Ivy League Coach of the Year
  • Eddie Reese, University of Texas Head Men's Swimming Coach; 2010 NCAA Champions; 3x Olympic Head Coach, 10 NCAA Championships, 8x NCAA Coach of the Year; member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame
  • Ray Looze, Indiana University Head Coach; 2016 Men's & Women's Big 10 Coach of the Year - first coach in Big 10 history to win both honors in the same year; 2016 U.S. Women's Olympic Swim Team Assistant Coach

This comprehensive collection of over 70 drills by top swimming coaches will revolutionize the way you approach backstroke with your swimmers. You will learn drills and progressions to teach and train championship backstroke at every level. Elite swimmers demonstrate the drills while some of the most successful swimming coaches in history describe how the drills should be done and what you should look for to improve every aspect of your swimmers' races.

This video contains a massive selection of backstroke drills ranging from basic fundamentals to technical training to fine tune the more advanced swimmers to achieve their full potential. It will give you everything you need to:

  • Correct persistent backstroke flaws
  • Develop efficient and sustainable speed in your backstrokers
  • Build comfort and confidence in backstroke for all of your swimmers
  • Design backstroke sets with variety and challenge all season long
  • Body Position

    Today's elite backstrokers ride higher in the water than ever before. Learn drills to get the best head position and core-driven body shape to ride higher in the water to minimize drag.

    • Challenge swimmers with Richard Quick's Pencil Progression to build perfect backstroke posture, line and balance for swimmers of all levels
    • Build core strength and body position awareness with drills from Ian Pope, Coley Stickels and David Marsh

    The Kick

    Great backstroke starts with a kick that is small enough to avoid drag, fast enough to generate speed, and steady enough to generate a sturdy base to anchor today's higher tempo arm recovery. Over 16 different drills focus on using a small, quick kick in correct alignment to improve a swimmer's power and speed:

    • From David Marsh, learn to use an ankle strap at knees and at ankles to generate a kick that produces forceful down and up kicks while minimizing knee lifting and fishtailing from a kick that is not tethered to an engaged core
    • Learn from Ohio State University coaches as they demonstrate kick drills that will help your swimmers drive a powerful kick from their cores without sacrificing ideal body position

    Catch, Pull, and Recovery

    Twenty drills focus on the correct hand and body position for the backstroke catch and recovery. Hand-entry position and pausing on the recovery are two common stroke errors that can be frustrating to correct. See how great coaches use drills to develop championship backstroke pulls. Learn the similarities and differences in amount of rotation entry width, depth of pull, turnover rate and aggressiveness of kick between 100 and 200 backstroke styles

    Full Stroke and Tempo

    Finally, putting the stroke together, you'll see many coaches' progressions of how these drills tie together into a complete, powerful backstroke. With the catch, rotation and recovery coupled with a strong kick, you can see a few complete backstroke drills focusing on power and speed for a complete backstroke. Adding a few breakout drills and the always-important underwater, this video contains everything a coach or swimmer may need to incorporate drills to work on backstroke in part or in whole.

    Many swimmers deal with the same drills over and over throughout a season until they become mindless. The drills found in this video do a great job of explaining and demonstrating so you can reciprocate this understanding for your team. The differences of coach explanations demonstrate a large diversity of knowledge found within this visual repository.

    Whether you are looking to get your novice athletes started in their career with the best foundational technique, looking to liven up your practice with innovative drill progressions done by the masters, or trying to balance the quality of your athletes' training session at a rapid training pace, this comprehensive library of drills and progressions for backstroke will meet your coaching needs.

    120 minutes. 2017.



    MD-05079C:

    featuring:

    • Richard Quick, former Head Coach at Texas (W), Auburn (M/W) and Stanford (W) Universities; 3x Olympic Coach; 12 NCAA Team Championships, 5x NCAA Coach of the Year
    • David Marsh, Head Coach, SwimMAC Carolina; 2016 USA Women's Olympic Team Head Coach, 12x NCAA Championship and 8x NCAA Coach of the Year (Auburn), 3x USA Men's Olympic Team Assistant
    • Frank Busch, USA Swimming National Team Director; 2x U.S. Olympic Swim Coach, former University of Arizona Head Coach; 2x NCAA Championship Coach; 6x National Coach of the Year; member of the American Swim Coaches Association (ASCA) Hall of Fame (2008)
    • Ian Pope, Melbourne Vicentre Swimming Club Head Coach, Olympic and National Team Coach for Australia; has coached a Gold Medalist in 6 consecutive World Championships ('98 to '09)
    • Bill Dorenkott, Ohio State's Women's Head Swimming Coach; has coached 28 student-athletes to 34 Big Ten individual championships
    • Bill Wadley, Head Coach for Ohio State's men's swim team, 2010 Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year
    • Coley Stickels, USA National Team Coach; Head Coach of Canyons Aquatic Club; 14x NCAA All-American with University of Arizona
    • Matt Kredich, University of Tennessee Head Coach; 2x SEC Women's Coach of the Year, 4x Ivy League Coach of the Year
    • Eddie Reese, University of Texas Head Men's Swimming Coach; 2010 NCAA Champions; 3x Olympic Head Coach, 10 NCAA Championships, 8x NCAA Coach of the Year; member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame
    • Ray Looze, Indiana University Head Coach; 2016 Men's & Women's Big 10 Coach of the Year - first coach in Big 10 history to win both honors in the same year; 2016 U.S. Women's Olympic Swim Team Assistant Coach
    • Kelly Kremer, University of Minnesota Head Women's Coach; coach of the 2011 NCAA champions in the 100 and 200 breaststroke events
    • Sheri Stoddard, Swim Pasadena Head Coach and Head Age Group Coach

    Of the four strokes, breaststroke is the most susceptible to drag forces. Any reduction in drag through better stroke mechanics will result in immediate improvements in speed and endurance. This comprehensive collection of over 90 drills by top swimming coaches will give you everything you need to diagnose stroke errors, hone technique and build explosive endurance.

    Most elite breaststroke coaches do surprisingly little full-stroke breaststroke each practice. Instead, they use drills to allow swimmers to fully focus on pushing each aspect of the stroke to their limit without exhaustion breaking down timing. Starting with drills focusing on correct body positioning, moving outward to the pull and kick, and finally progressing to drills focusing on timing and the stroke as a whole, this video will help swimmers of all levels master the breaststroke. It will give you everything you need to:

    • Correct persistent breaststroke flaws
    • Develop efficient and sustainable speed in your breaststrokers
    • Build comfort and confidence in breaststroke for all your swimmers
    • Design breaststroke sets with variety and challenge all season long

    Horizontal Body Line

    Keeping a good streamlined body position is vital to the breaststroke. Get a treasure trove of favorite drills on how to improve body posture, line and balance for an easier, faster and more efficient breaststroke. You'll see on-deck and in-water techniques to fire lower abs to maintain stable hips and allow explosive recovery to the ideal line. Or, diagnose stroke flaws with resistance drills that allow swimmers to feel where their stroke is inefficient and help them make corrections

    Eliminating Dead Spots

    Improving hand speed on the breaststroke is important for a quick, powerful swim. You'll learn drills that use underwater recovery to improve tempo and timing with the stroke. Other drills show how a swimmer can get a feel for the timing by throwing their arms out of the water, like in the Cobra Drill, to get into a better body position quickly. Drills are used to:

    • Learn to lead tempo with the core, instead of just the hands, for acceleration through the pull recovery that enhances distance per stroke
    • Develop momentum by timing the kick recovery to occur in the shadow of the upper body, minimizing drag and coordinating body movement
    • Teach a pull pattern that helps swimmers hold water for a strong anchor that allows the core to power the hips forward
    • Focus swimmers on having all motion going forward, instead of up and down, for maximum efficiency and speed

    The Kick

    The kick is probably the most important part of being a good breaststroker. This video has numerous drills to help improve flexibility, feel and power to the kick. Whether it's underwater, upside down or one leg at a time, isolating the legs will help improve swimmers' range of motion and power to aid in a stronger breaststroke.

    Pullouts and Breakouts

    The fastest part of every breaststroke race. Drills included will:

    • Develop ideal timing and shape of the kickout to sustain momentum from the start or turn
    • Teach a low-resistance, high power pull down that ends in proper position to initiate the first kick
    • Time the first kick and the breakout to explode into the first full breaststroke to establish an explosive tempo

    This video is a great tool for any coach looking for a few new, easy drills to help a struggling breaststroker or to work on certain aspects to improve the best of the best. A wide variety of drills focusing on all aspects of the stroke will aid any coach looking to expand their coaching repertoire.

    162 minutes. 2017.



    MD-05079D:

    featuring:

    • Richard Quick, former Head Coach at Texas (W), Auburn (M/W) and Stanford (W) Universities; 3x Olympic Coach; 12 NCAA Team Championships, 5x NCAA Coach of the Year
    • David Marsh, Head Coach, SwimMAC Carolina; 2016 USA Women's Olympic Team Head Coach, 12x NCAA Championship and 8x NCAA Coach of the Year (Auburn), 3x USA Men's Olympic Team Assistant
    • Frank Busch, USA Swimming National Team Director; 2x U.S. Olympic Swim Coach, former University of Arizona Head Coach; 2x NCAA Championship Coach; 6x National Coach of the Year; member of the American Swim Coaches Association (ASCA) Hall of Fame (2008)
    • Ian Pope, Melbourne Vicentre Swimming Club Head Coach, Olympic and National Team Coach for Australia; has coached a Gold Medalist in 6 consecutive World Championships ('98 to '09)
    • Bill Dorenkott, Ohio State's Women's Head Swimming Coach; has coached 28 student-athletes to 34 Big Ten individual championships
    • Bill Wadley, Head Coach for Ohio State's men's swim team, 2010 Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year
    • Coley Stickels, USA National Team Coach; Head Coach of Canyons Aquatic Club; 14x NCAA All-American with University of Arizona
    • Matt Kredich, University of Tennessee Head Coach; 2x SEC Women's Coach of the Year, 4x Ivy League Coach of the Year
    • Eddie Reese, University of Texas Head Men's Swimming Coach; 2010 NCAA Champions; 3x Olympic Head Coach, 10 NCAA Championships, 8x NCAA Coach of the Year; member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame
    • Rich DeSelm, University of North Carolina Head Coach; 2014 U.S. Swimming National Team Coach; 2011 World University Games Head Coach

    Butterfly can be a difficult stroke to master and a taxing stroke to swim. However, once swimmers develop the timing and rhythm, it can become a favorite stroke. This comprehensive collection of over 60 drills by top swimming coaches will give you everything you need to help young swimmers learn to love butterfly and elite swimmers maximize their speed with less fatigue.

    Beginning with the importance of the balance that keeps one on top of the water, to the kick and the importance of a proper catch, each coach gives great drills detailing every portion of the butterfly. This collection will give you everything you need to:

    • Correct persistent butterfly flaws
    • Develop efficient and sustainable speed in your butterfliers
    • Build comfort and confidence in butterfly for all your swimmers
    • Design butterfly sets with variety and challenge all season long

    Body Line

    Teach your swimmers the ideal butterfly body line and train their core to sustain it for a more efficient and effortless stroke. You'll see drills that:

    • Correct up and down motions that do not translate to forward momentum
    • Correct breathing flaws that may disrupt timing or ideal body position

    Balance is one of the most important aspects of any swim stroke. A head riding too high or hips dragging in the water can create drag. You'll learn that balance drills don't always have to be done flat on the water. The Vertical Fly Kick drill off the bottom of the pool teaches posture and balance.

    Timing and Rhythm

    In this section, you'll learn timing drills that will encourage proper rhythm in butterfly for a stronger and smoother swim. You'll also see how to improve engagement of the posterior core muscle groups for a more balanced and powerful stroke that is more injury-resistant. Drills are shown that set a strong catch that anchors the front of the stroke so that the swimmer can vault their hips forward

    Build a strong, steady and balanced core-driven kick that is crucial for good timing and rhythm. Eddie Reese and the other coaches created 13 different kick drills that emphasize the importance of body positioning in the water and appropriate body undulation. Matt Kredich also explains the value of using pool equipment such as snorkels, fins, and kicking socks to help build stronger, more technical swimmers.

    Underwater Dolphins and Breakouts

    A great race begins with a great start and breakout. The transfer of momentum from the underwater kick to the first stroke sets the tempo of the swim. You'll see drills that will:

    • Teach swimmers to increase range of motion off the wall as they prepare for the first stroke
    • Help each swimmer develop a consistent breakout strategy based on the strength of their underwater work and their breath control
    • Time the breakout to explode into the first full butterfly to establish an explosive tempo

    With over 60 drills from some of the most reputable coaches in the world, you will be hard pressed to find a more extensive collection of practical butterfly drills that can help swimmers of all ages and abilities become masters of the fly.

    134 minutes. 2017.



    DVD
    Buy at Championship Productions

    Cover: best of championship productions: 60 drills for butterfly swimming
    Best of Championship Productions: 60 Drills for Butterfly Swimming

    featuring:

    • Richard Quick, former Head Coach at Texas (W), Auburn (M/W) and Stanford (W) Universities; 3x Olympic Coach; 12 NCAA Team Championships, 5x NCAA Coach of the Year
    • David Marsh, Head Coach, SwimMAC Carolina; 2016 USA Women's Olympic Team Head Coach, 12x NCAA Championship and 8x NCAA Coach of the Year (Auburn), 3x USA Men's Olympic Team Assistant
    • Frank Busch, USA Swimming National Team Director; 2x U.S. Olympic Swim Coach, former University of Arizona Head Coach; 2x NCAA Championship Coach; 6x National Coach of the Year; member of the American Swim Coaches Association (ASCA) Hall of Fame (2008)
    • Ian Pope, Melbourne Vicentre Swimming Club Head Coach, Olympic and National Team Coach for Australia; has coached a Gold Medalist in 6 consecutive World Championships ('98 to '09)
    • Bill Dorenkott, Ohio State's Women's Head Swimming Coach; has coached 28 student-athletes to 34 Big Ten individual championships
    • Bill Wadley, Head Coach for Ohio State's men's swim team, 2010 Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year
    • Coley Stickels, USA National Team Coach; Head Coach of Canyons Aquatic Club; 14x NCAA All-American with University of Arizona
    • Matt Kredich, University of Tennessee Head Coach; 2x SEC Women's Coach of the Year, 4x Ivy League Coach of the Year
    • Eddie Reese, University of Texas Head Men's Swimming Coach; 2010 NCAA Champions; 3x Olympic Head Coach, 10 NCAA Championships, 8x NCAA Coach of the Year; member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame
    • Rich DeSelm, University of North Carolina Head Coach; 2014 U.S. Swimming National Team Coach; 2011 World University Games Head Coach

    Butterfly can be a difficult stroke to master and a taxing stroke to swim. However, once swimmers develop the timing and rhythm, it can become a favorite stroke. This comprehensive collection of over 60 drills by top swimming coaches will give you everything you need to help young swimmers learn to love butterfly and elite swimmers maximize their speed with less fatigue.

    Beginning with the importance of the balance that keeps one on top of the water, to the kick and the importance of a proper catch, each coach gives great drills detailing every portion of the butterfly. This collection will give you everything you need to:

    • Correct persistent butterfly flaws
    • Develop efficient and sustainable speed in your butterfliers
    • Build comfort and confidence in butterfly for all your swimmers
    • Design butterfly sets with variety and challenge all season long

    Body Line

    Teach your swimmers the ideal butterfly body line and train their core to sustain it for a more efficient and effortless stroke. You'll see drills that:

    • Correct up and down motions that do not translate to forward momentum
    • Correct breathing flaws that may disrupt timing or ideal body position

    Balance is one of the most important aspects of any swim stroke. A head riding too high or hips dragging in the water can create drag. You'll learn that balance drills don't always have to be done flat on the water. The Vertical Fly Kick drill off the bottom of the pool teaches posture and balance.

    Timing and Rhythm

    In this section, you'll learn timing drills that will encourage proper rhythm in butterfly for a stronger and smoother swim. You'll also see how to improve engagement of the posterior core muscle groups for a more balanced and powerful stroke that is more injury-resistant. Drills are shown that set a strong catch that anchors the front of the stroke so that the swimmer can vault their hips forward

    Build a strong, steady and balanced core-driven kick that is crucial for good timing and rhythm. Eddie Reese and the other coaches created 13 different kick drills that emphasize the importance of body positioning in the water and appropriate body undulation. Matt Kredich also explains the value of using pool equipment such as snorkels, fins, and kicking socks to help build stronger, more technical swimmers.

    Underwater Dolphins and Breakouts

    A great race begins with a great start and breakout. The transfer of momentum from the underwater kick to the first stroke sets the tempo of the swim. You'll see drills that will:

    • Teach swimmers to increase range of motion off the wall as they prepare for the first stroke
    • Help each swimmer develop a consistent breakout strategy based on the strength of their underwater work and their breath control
    • Time the breakout to explode into the first full butterfly to establish an explosive tempo

    With over 60 drills from some of the most reputable coaches in the world, you will be hard pressed to find a more extensive collection of practical butterfly drills that can help swimmers of all ages and abilities become masters of the fly.

    134 minutes. 2017.

    DVD
    Buy at Championship Productions


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