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Cover: let the games begin! how to run a game-based tennis practice
Let the Games Begin! How to Run a Game-Based Tennis Practice

with Greg Patton,
former Boise State University Head Coach;
former UC Irvine Head Coach;
former Head Junior National Coach with the USA Junior National Team (roster included Pete Sampras, Jim Courier, Michael Chang, Patrick McEnroe, Luke Jensen, David Wheaton, MaliVai Washington);
2x NCAA/ITA National Coach of the Year (only coach to win the Division I National Collegiate Coach of the Year honor at two different universities);
5x ITA Region Coach of the Year;
2x USTA/NCAA National Community Service Award winner;
21 NCAA Tournament team appearances;
24 Conference Tournament championships;
member of the Boise State University Hall of Fame (class of 2001)

There has been a push recently toward a more game-based approach to learning tennis. Utilizing games in your practices can not only make your practices more fun and enjoyable for your players, but also increase the speed and ease at which athletes learn and develop.

In this video, Greg Patton takes you through 18 different game-based drills that he has utilized with his collegiate teams and his junior national teams and how to "keep score" with each game/drill. He runs players through warm-up drills to get the feet, eyes and hands stimulated, as well as volley drills, baseline drills, doubles drills, and fun full-team drills to end practice.

Coach Patton not only shows game-based drills you can utilize, but also how you can transform drills you already use into exercises that will make your practices more competitive and increase the rate at which your players develop.

Fast-Paced Large-Group Drills

Learn a variety of fast-paced group drills that will help warm your players up and get them excited right at the start of practice. Coach Patton shows how these drills get your players moving and talking, and why they work great with large groups of players on each court. Patton is able to accomplish this with drills like:

  • The Volley Rotation Drill, which emphasizes lots of movement and is great for stimulating the feet, hands, and eyes.
  • The Approach Shot Volley Drill, which works on transition shots that lead you to the net and helps you play more aggressively.
  • The Mini-Me Drill, with several variations, that helps players better warm up their hands while making sure they communicate well.

Coach Patton feels that the feet, hands, and eyes are the most important components of tennis and these drills work to stimulate and activate all three components.

Full-Court Drills for Consistency and Footwork

To be a great player, Patton believes you need to be consistent, move your feet to put your body in the position he calls the "wheelhouse," and you must possess what he calls a "weapon." As he moves his players back to the baseline, Coach Patton's drills continue to focus on and develop all three of these components. You will learn competitive drills, and how to score them, such as:

  • The Paint the Line Drill, which works on hitting the ball deep with shape.
  • Dingles, a fast-paced drill with multiple balls going at one time which works on both singles and doubles play while promoting aggressiveness.
  • Coach Patton's variation on the popular Rally Alley Drill and how he scores it.

Patton finishes up by demonstrating some of the full team drills he often uses at the end of his practices to continue to refine the work that has already been done while also building a sense of family and fun. One such drill is his "Execution Reincarnation Drill" where players on each team take turns returning each shot, but with only one racquet used for each team. Players that make a mistake are forced to sit down on the court with their own racquet where they can be "reincarnated" back into the game if they are able to return a shot from their seated position.

Coach Patton's enthusiasm and passion for the game of tennis is evident throughout this video. He brings a lot of energy to the court, as do all of his drills.

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions

Cover: training rally footwork in large groups
Training Rally Footwork in Large Groups

with David Bailey,
Founder of The Bailey Method (a research-based, data driver tennis footwork & movement training program);
footwork & movement consultant and trainer to over 21 Grand Slam players;
over 30 years of coaching experience;
USPTA World Conference presenter, writer for TennisPro Magazine and tennisplayer.net

The best tennis players in the world move elegantly around the court with amazing footwork. All tennis players know the importance of good footwork - it allows athletes to get to more wide balls, hit more powerful shots, and recover more efficiently.

Yet, few players practice footwork consistently. For many, footwork seems too complex and boring to practice. Even experienced tennis coaches have trouble teaching it and getting their students interested in working on movement.

Thankfully, in this video, world renowned tennis footwork and movement training guru David Bailey presents how tennis footwork and movement training can be incorporated into practice. By following progressions that transition from easy to challenging, Bailey demonstrates a fun, dynamic way of learning footwork.

Rallying Footwork

The focus of this video is how to handle balls in baseline rallies. For most players, the majority of shots are hit from the baseline, and it is fundamental to be in an optimum position to handle different types of shots received. Rallying footwork involves maintaining a player's position on the baseline regardless of the speed or spin of the shot received. Coach Bailey guides a small group through four footwork patterns that can be utilized to handle these rally situations:

  • The 2 Foot Pivot - Ideal to handle fast, incoming balls.
  • 1 Foot Pivot - A way to generate a good mix of spin and power when the player has more time.
  • Lateral Hop - Utilized when ball is a few strides away. A great footwork pattern to execute when the player wants to go cross court or short angle.
  • Closed Backhand - The standard footwork pattern for one-handed and two-handed backhands.

Throughout the video, Bailey gives technical quick tips on how to adjust the forehand and backhand for each of the footwork patterns.

5 Stages of Footwork Training

With over 30 years of coaching experience to draw upon, Coach Bailey has developed a fun and effective progressive method of learning footwork. The power of this method is that even beginners can perform the footwork patterns and improve their movement. For each of the four rallying footwork patterns, Bailey demonstrates each stage of his footwork progression:

1. Shadow - This first progression is done without a racket. The player executes the footwork pattern at a slow pace with emphasis on performing quality repetitions for both the backhand and forehand.
2. Shadow the Move - The second progression is done at the baseline with the racket but no tennis ball. The player shadows both the forehand and backhand. The instructor can observe every player in a large group very easily.
3. Lines - In the third progression, the instructor introduces the ball with hand feeds. The player executes the footwork pattern for both forehands and backhands in a slow, controlled manner.
4. Self-Feed - In the fourth progression, the player feeds a ball to themselves and executes the footwork pattern. By this stage, the player will start to become more comfortable with the footwork.
5. Full Court - In the fifth progression, players self-feed and play out points. The emphasis is still on executing the footwork pattern correctly in a live ball situation.

Ideal for Groups

Coach Bailey's Method is perfect for learning in a group. In the early progressions which are done at a slow pace, the instructor can easily observe multiple players and courts executing the footwork pattern and make corrections as necessary. As the ball is introduced, the patterns can be practiced by the group with fun point-play. If the group has been dilig

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions

Cover: training defensive footwork in large groups
Training Defensive Footwork in Large Groups

with David Bailey,
Founder of The Bailey Method (a research-based, data driver tennis footwork & movement training program);
footwork & movement consultant and trainer to over 21 Grand Slam players;
over 30 years of coaching experience;
USPTA World Conference presenter, writer for TennisPro Magazine and tennisplayer.net

David Bailey shares many of the progressions and training tips he uses to teach defensive footwork for tennis players. You'll learn multiple footwork patterns and shots specific to defensive play that will ensure you're never caught off-guard by an aggressive opponent during a match.

Defensive Footwork

The focus of this video is how to handle balls that put the player in a defensive position. Defensive footwork is needed when a player is pushed very wide or back off the baseline by a high, floating ball. Coach Bailey guides a group of players through four footwork patterns that can be utilized to handle these defensive situations:

  • The Mogul Move - The most common method to handle wide balls.
  • The Power Move - A fun footwork pattern to generate more power on wide balls
  • Backfoot Hop - A way to handle balls that push the player back and still generate lots of topspin.
  • Reverse Spin Move - For players who love to hit semi-open and generate a heavy ball - even from a defensive position.

Throughout the video, Bailey gives technical quick tips on how to adjust the forehand and backhand for each of the footwork patterns.

5 Stages of Footwork Training

With over 30 years of footwork and movement training coaching experience to draw upon, Coach Bailey has developed a fun and effective progressive method of learning footwork. The power of this method is that even beginners can perform the footwork patterns and improve their movement. For each of the four rallying footwork patterns, Bailey demonstrates each stage of his footwork progression:

1. Shadow - This first progression is done without a racket. The player executes the footwork pattern at a slow pace with emphasis on performing quality repetitions for both the backhand and forehand.
2. Shadow the Move - The second progression is done at the baseline with the racket but no tennis ball. The player shadows both the forehand and backhand. The instructor can observe every player in a large group very easily.
3. Lines - In the third progression, the instructor introduces the ball with hand feeds. The player executes the footwork pattern for both forehands and backhands in a slow, controlled manner.
4. Self-Feed - In the fourth progression, the player feeds a ball to themselves and executes the footwork pattern. By this stage, the player will start to become more comfortable with the footwork.
5. Full Court - In the fifth progression, players self-feed and play out points. The emphasis is still on executing the footwork pattern correctly in a live ball situation.

There will be times during a match where all players must go on the defensive in order to win points. This video from Coach Bailey will help you shore up your defensive footwork, or teach it to your athletes, so you can emerge victorious in more matches.

58 minutes. 2019.

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions

Cover: training attacking footwork in large groups
Training Attacking Footwork in Large Groups

with David Bailey,
Founder of The Bailey Method (a research-based, data driver tennis footwork & movement training program);
footwork & movement consultant and trainer to over 21 Grand Slam players;
over 30 years of coaching experience;
USPTA World Conference presenter, writer for TennisPro Magazine and tennisplayer.net

Footwork and movement are vital to success in tennis, yet they are often overlooked when it comes to player development. Many coaches spend too much time on teaching stroke fundamentals and not enough time on the movement necessary to execute them.

Using a five-step progression methodology, David Bailey demonstrates four groundstroke techniques in this video, including the front foot hop, rhythm step down, low spin, and run-around transfer. Coach Bailey provides in-depth technique breakdown during these steps, allowing you to see how fundamentals can be implemented in a medium-to-large group setting.

Five Stages of Footwork Training

You will learn how to use a progressive teaching methodology to break down advanced footwork techniques. Bailey explains the teaching points he emphasizes for each of the four groundstroke techniques:

  • Shadow - Players shadow the movement of the coach, using a template.
  • Shadow the Move - Players shadow the movement of the coach again, this time without a template.
  • Move into Lines - Players move into lines and take turns practicing the moves with a ball thrown by the coach.
  • Remain in Lines - Players remain in lines and take turns practicing the moves, this time with a self-feed.
  • Split into Two Groups - Players split into two even groups and use the same self-drop, only this time they play out the point.

Four Groundstroke Techniques

Coach Bailey begins by teaching players how to use the template (two colored discs) to teach form for the split step - a step that is vital in the sport of tennis. The split step, along with the necessary `ready steps' are emphasized throughout the four groundstroke techniques. Using his five stages of footwork training, Bailey begins teaching the first groundstroke technique: the front foot hop. Using the template, he breaks down the appropriate hip, body, and foot movement necessary to execute proper forehand and backhand technique associated with the front foot hop. Throughout the five stages, Bailey emphasizes ready steps, split steps, and recovery position.

Practice progresses and cycles into the other three groundstroke techniques, all shown through the lens of the five stage progression. As a coach, you will not only get a sound feel for how to demonstrate these shots to your athletes, but you will also get to see how they can be incorporated to teach multiple players at the same time.

One of the more valuable components of this video comes from getting to see how players progress from shadow moves all the way to live ball situations. Throughout the entire video, Bailey uses positive, concise phrasing to reinforce these techniques and provides a stimulating, exciting environment from which the players can thrive.

You will clearly see that Bailey has dedicated his coaching life to mastering the art of teaching footwork and movement to his players. Tennis coaches of all levels will greatly benefit from this video, as you not only learn the intricacies of proper movement, but you learn how to teach them in a way that makes it easy and fun for a group!

45 minutes. 2019.

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions

Cover: david bailey's training footworktennis series
David Bailey's Training FootworkTennis Series
TND-05610A:

with David Bailey,
Founder of The Bailey Method (a research-based, data driver tennis footwork & movement training program);
footwork & movement consultant and trainer to over 21 Grand Slam players;
over 30 years of coaching experience;
USPTA World Conference presenter, writer for TennisPro Magazine and tennisplayer.net

Footwork and movement are vital to success in tennis, yet they are often overlooked when it comes to player development. Many coaches spend too much time on teaching stroke fundamentals and not enough time on the movement necessary to execute them.

Using a five-step progression methodology, David Bailey demonstrates four groundstroke techniques in this video, including the front foot hop, rhythm step down, low spin, and run-around transfer. Coach Bailey provides in-depth technique breakdown during these steps, allowing you to see how fundamentals can be implemented in a medium-to-large group setting.

Five Stages of Footwork Training

You will learn how to use a progressive teaching methodology to break down advanced footwork techniques. Bailey explains the teaching points he emphasizes for each of the four groundstroke techniques:

  • Shadow - Players shadow the movement of the coach, using a template.
  • Shadow the Move - Players shadow the movement of the coach again, this time without a template.
  • Move into Lines - Players move into lines and take turns practicing the moves with a ball thrown by the coach.
  • Remain in Lines - Players remain in lines and take turns practicing the moves, this time with a self-feed.
  • Split into Two Groups - Players split into two even groups and use the same self-drop, only this time they play out the point.

Four Groundstroke Techniques

Coach Bailey begins by teaching players how to use the template (two colored discs) to teach form for the split step - a step that is vital in the sport of tennis. The split step, along with the necessary `ready steps' are emphasized throughout the four groundstroke techniques. Using his five stages of footwork training, Bailey begins teaching the first groundstroke technique: the front foot hop. Using the template, he breaks down the appropriate hip, body, and foot movement necessary to execute proper forehand and backhand technique associated with the front foot hop. Throughout the five stages, Bailey emphasizes ready steps, split steps, and recovery position.

Practice progresses and cycles into the other three groundstroke techniques, all shown through the lens of the five stage progression. As a coach, you will not only get a sound feel for how to demonstrate these shots to your athletes, but you will also get to see how they can be incorporated to teach multiple players at the same time.

One of the more valuable components of this video comes from getting to see how players progress from shadow moves all the way to live ball situations. Throughout the entire video, Bailey uses positive, concise phrasing to reinforce these techniques and provides a stimulating, exciting environment from which the players can thrive.

You will clearly see that Bailey has dedicated his coaching life to mastering the art of teaching footwork and movement to his players. Tennis coaches of all levels will greatly benefit from this video, as you not only learn the intricacies of proper movement, but you learn how to teach them in a way that makes it easy and fun for a group!

45 minutes. 2019.



TND-05610B:

with David Bailey,
Founder of The Bailey Method (a research-based, data driver tennis footwork & movement training program);
footwork & movement consultant and trainer to over 21 Grand Slam players;
over 30 years of coaching experience;
USPTA World Conference presenter, writer for TennisPro Magazine and tennisplayer.net

The best tennis players in the world move elegantly around the court with amazing footwork. All tennis players know the importanc

DVD
Buy at Championship Productions


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